Bossier City attorney John E. Settle Jr.'s second suspension in less than a year was one of two interim suspensions handed down by the Louisiana Supreme Court in July, according to separate orders.

The state's highest court handed down its July 13 order against Settle, in practice for almost 40 years, following an office of disciplinary counsel petition for the interim suspension for "threat of harm." The order did not specify how long the interim suspension should last, except that it is "pending further orders of this court."

The court also authorized the office of disciplinary counsel to seek the appointment at least one trustee to protect Settle's clients and their interests.

Settle was admitted to the bar in Louisiana on Oct. 7, 1977, according to his profile at the Louisiana State Bar's website

The Louisiana Supreme Court in April 2012 handed down a deferred suspension against Settle for a year and a day after Settle twice was charged with operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The office of disciplinary counsel shortly after began an investigation but, before filing formal charges, filed a joint petition with Settle for consent discipline, which the high court accepted.

The deferral of that suspension was subject to Settle's successful completion of a five-year recovery agreement with the Lawyers Assistance Program. As part of that agreement, Settle was required to abstain from alcohol and to submit to random testing for alcohol consumption. Failing to meet those requirements would be possible grounds to making the deferred suspension executory or the imposition of additional discipline, according to the 2012 order.

In October the high court handed down a six-month suspension against Settle after he tested positive for alcohol, a violation of the previous recovery agreement.

In a separate discipline, the Louisiana Supreme Court handed down a July 6 order for an interim suspension against Iowa and Louisiana attorney Marcus Paul LaCombe. The order did not specify how long the interim suspension should last but did say it was "effective immediately".

The high court was acting on a petition for petition for interim suspension filed by the office of disciplinary counsel.

LaCombe was admitted to the bar in Louisiana on Oct. 10, 2003, according to his profile at the Louisiana State Bar's website.

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Louisiana Supreme Court
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