Attorney suspended following no contest plea to domestic abuse

By Karen Kidd | Jun 19, 2018

NEW ORLEANS (Louisiana Record) — A suspended attorney Marcus Paul LaCombe, of Iowa, Louisiana, has received another suspension following a June 15 Louisiana Supreme Court attorney disciplinary proceeding after his no contest plea in November to domestic abuse.

NEW ORLEANS (Louisiana Record) — A suspended attorney Marcus Paul LaCombe, of Iowa, Louisiana, has received another suspension following a June 15 Louisiana Supreme Court attorney disciplinary proceeding after his no contest plea in November to domestic abuse.

The state Supreme Court suspended LaCombe for two years, retroactive to July 6, the beginning date of his interim suspension. The high court accepted a joint petition for consent discipline agreed to between LaCombe and the office of disciplinary counsel following formal charges filed by the office of disciplinary counsel, according to the high court's single-page attorney disciplinary proceeding.

LaCombe also was ordered to pay costs and expenses in the matter.

LaCombe was admitted to the bar in Louisiana on Oct. 10, 2003, according to his profile at the Louisiana State Bar's website. No previous discipline was listed on his state bar profile.

In November, LaCombe was sentenced by a 14th Judicial District Court judge in Calasieu Parish to five years in prison, with all but one year suspended and he received credit for time, according to a news report at the time. His sentence followed his pleaded no contest to felony domestic abuse, aggravated assault and misdemeanor domestic abuse battery, according to the attorney disciplinary proceeding.

LaComb's ex-wife told division district court family and juvenile court judge G. Michael Canaday that she and her four children lived in fear of LaCombe during their 20-year marriage and they "had to continuously walk on eggshells" around him, according to the news report. LaCombe's former mother-in-law testified he "terrorized" her daughter, "even during her pregnancies".

Canady reportedly told LaCombe, who was 45 at the time of his sentencing, that he was "an educated and intellectual man" with "some demons you're dealing with" and ordered him to continue with counseling. Canaday also allowed Lacombe a month to report to begin serving his sentence because LaCombe's mother was ill in a Houston hospital at the time of his sentencing.

His interim suspension the previous July had been effective immediately and followed a petition filed by the office of disciplinary counsel.

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